Happened from 2015-04-19 to 2015-04-25


We were part of CukeUp! 2015

By Carlos Ble on 2015-04-19

Agile, BDD

I had the pleasure of speaking at CukeUp! this year (2015), the fifth edition of Cucumber's conference which is more about BDD than Cucumber itself, although there are always updates on the state of the tool (this year Matt released version 2.0 during his talk!) It's been a great conference, I've learned a bunch of things, met […]

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Your Django Story: Meet Jamillah Mayombwe

By anna-oz on 2015-04-20

This is a post in our Your Django Story series where we highlight awesome ladies who work with Django. Read more about it here. 

Jamillah is a software developer currently living in Kampala, Uganda. She’s very excited about tech innovations and pushing boundaries with everything she sets her mind to, to be the best she can be in whatever she does. When Jamillah isn’t writing code, she spends her time giving the fictitious characters that run in her head life and a home in her very personal journal that will one day become a best seller.

image

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Using relationships to build your business

On 2015-04-20

margaret-pagel

I always keep an extra Wisconsin shirt in my car. I grew up in Wisconsin, and I’m an avid fan of the Green Bay Packers and Wisconsin Badgers. I still follow those teams closely, even though I split time between Chicago and Florida now. The biggest difference between those two places is the weather, and I cherish the opportunity to go for a walk on the beach each day before starting my work. These walks allow me to clear my head and start each day fresh. I leave my phone and my worries at home, but I always make sure I’m wearing a Wisconsin shirt.

This might seem like a small thing, but it isn’t just an act of loyalty to my homeland. Whether it’s because they grew up in Wisconsin or simply root for the same team, someone always seems to say hello or reach out for a high five—but I don’t let the conversation end there. I love meeting new people, and this is one of the few times when I can’t be distracted by my phone or work. I always stop walking and talk to them. What about my shirt interested them? Where are they from? What are they doing here? What might we have in common?

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Hello world, I am Laravel (5)

On 2015-04-21

So there is this thing called Laravel. You may have heard of it already, but you're not sure what it is actually about? Or you do, but want to know more about it and its great new features in version 5? Great, this post is especially for you! Laravel is at the same time one of the youngest and most popular PHP frameworks out there. So how does this work together? Let us take a closer look at why it is that popular and how it could be of use for you too. We will go through the main functionalities and talk about brand new features in version 5.

Intro

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What is an Engineer?

By Miguel Ángel García on 2015-04-21

In this article I will talk about what Engineering means to me.

I'd like to ask any reader that, before reading this article, use a couple of minutes to answer the question: "What does 'to be an Engineer' mean?". After this small exercise, I suggest to write a short answer down in a piece of paper.

After doing that, you can read the article. If it likes you or not, compare my answer with yours. Finally, try to define it again and, if you want, share your definition as a comment.

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Rolling out the mobile-friendly update

By Google Webmaster Central (noreply@blogger.com) on 2015-04-21

mobile, mobile-friendly, webmaster community

As we noted earlier this year, today’s the day we begin globally rolling out our mobile-friendly update. We’re boosting the ranking of mobile-friendly pages on mobile search results. Now searchers can more easily find high-quality and relevant results where text is readable without tapping or zooming, tap targets are spaced appropriately, and the page avoids unplayable content or horizontal scrolling.

Screen Shot 2015-04-07 at 2.20.01 AM.pngApril 21st’s mobile-friendly update boosts mobile search rankings for pages that are legible and usable on mobile devices.

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FAQs about the April 21st mobile-friendly update

By Google Webmaster Central (noreply@blogger.com) on 2015-04-21

mobile, mobile-friendly, webmaster community

We’d like to share answers to your frequently asked questions. For background, in February, we announced that the mobile-friendly update will boost the rankings of mobile-friendly pages -- pages that are legible and usable on mobile devices -- in mobile search results worldwide. (Conversely, pages designed for only large screens may see a significant decrease in rankings in mobile search results.) To get us all on the same page, here are the most frequently asked questions:

General FAQs

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Just Say No to More End-to-End Tests

By Google Testing Bloggers (noreply@blogger.com) on 2015-04-22

Mike Wacker

by Mike Wacker

At some point in your life, you can probably recall a movie that you and your friends all wanted to see, and that you and your friends all regretted watching afterwards. Or maybe you remember that time your team thought they’d found the next "killer feature" for their product, only to see that feature bomb after it was released.

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Refactoring a Regex

On 2015-04-22

philip-szalwinski

Regular expressions are a powerful way to search through and manipulate text. But as we know from Spiderman, with great power comes greatly reduced readability. In my current side project, I'm using regexes as part of a dynamic comment generator for teachers to provide meaningful feedback to students. The intent of this tool is to reuse comments that a teacher has already written and apply them mad-libs style to similarly performing students. With the goal of writing extendable, readable code that adheres to the SOLID principles, let's refactor a shamelessly rigid example in which we replace all pronouns with their grammatical form so that they can later be re-substituted with male or female pronouns.

  text.gsub!(/(\bhis\b|\bher\b|\bhe\b|\bshe\b|\bhim\b)/i,
            "his" => ":possessive_pronoun:",
            "His" => ":possessive_pronoun:",
            "her" => ":possessive_pronoun:",
            "Her" => ":possessive_pronoun:",
            "he"  => ":personal_pronoun:",
            "He"  => ":personal_pronoun:",
            "she" => ":personal_pronoun:",
            "She" => ":personal_pronoun:",
            "him" => ":dative_personal_pronoun:",
            "Him" => ":dative_personal_pronoun:",
           )

The gsub! method takes in a regular expression as its first argument. The second argument could be a single word so that any time a match is found a single substitution could be made. But here we want to conditionally substitute. For that, the hash of matches to their substitutes is provided as the second argument. For example, when gsub! finds "his" it looks to the value stored under the "his" key, which is ":possessive_pronoun:". The first thing to do here is to give this method a good name. How about substitute_pronouns.

  def substitute_pronouns(text)
    text.gsub!(/(\bhis\b|\bher\b|\bhe\b|\bshe\b|\bhim\b)/i,
              "his" => ":possessive_pronoun:",
              "His" => ":possessive_pronoun:",
              "her" => ":possessive_pronoun:",
              "Her" => ":possessive_pronoun:",
              "he"  => ":personal_pronoun:",
              "He"  => ":personal_pronoun:",
              "she" => ":personal_pronoun:",
              "She" => ":personal_pronoun:",
              "him" => ":dative_personal_pronoun:",
              "Him" => ":dative_personal_pronoun:",
             )
  end

Next, the regex could use a name. It's looking for pronouns, so that sounds like a reasonable name.

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